Die Rücksprache bei Gen. Arnold

1. Die Otis-Verzögerung

Die 9/11 gültigen Richtlinien für eine Flugzeugentführung besagen, dass die FAA im Fall einer Flugzeugentführung das NMCC benachrichtigen muss, welches wiederum die Erlaubnis des Verteidigungsministers zum Start von Abfangjägern einholt. Vom NMCC geht die Erlaubnis dann zu NORAD und dort die Kanäle hinunter bis zu einer in Frage kommenden AFB. (Details vgl. Richtlinien Entführung, Teil 1)
Aus der Sicht des NEADS bedeutet dies, dass die Aufforderung nach Abfangjägern im Entführungsfall NEADS nicht seitens der FAA erreicht, sondern über die nächsthöhere gelegene Abteilung bei NORAD, d.h. NORAD HQ selbst oder CONR.
9/11 handelte das ARTCC Boston (ZBW) anders. Neben dem Inkraftsetzen der laut Vorschrift erforderlichen Kommunikationskette informierte das ZBW eigenständig NEADS. (Details vgl. Richtlinien Entführung, Teil 2)
Die Bitte um Abfangjäger für einen Entführungsfall erreichte NEADS also vorschriftswidrig direkt über die FAA. Colonel Marr zögerte deshalb einige Minuten. Das ZBW rief um 08:38 Uhr an, Marr verordnete – zunächst ohne Autorisierung von oben – Gefechtsgereitschaft [battle stations] für die Otis AFB um 08:41 und gab schließlich den Startbefehl [scramble] um 08:46, acht Minuten nach dem Anruf des ZBW.

1241:32 [Jeremy Powell, NEADS] htr this is huntress placing panta four five four six on battlestations i repeat battlestations time one two four one authenticate hotel romeo all parties acknowledge with initials
[...]
1246:48 htr this is huntress with an active air defense scramble for panta four five four six time one two four six authenticate delta xray scramble immediately panta four five four six heading two eight zero flight level two niner zero contact huntress on frequency two two eight decimal niner back up three six four decimal two all parties acknowledge with initials

(Cape TRACON Radar Approach Control, Otis ANGB)

Die rechtliche Einschätzung bei NORAD

Zwischen 08:41 und 08:46 Uhr erbat Marr die Autorisierung seines nächsthöheren Vorgesetzten, Gen. Larry Arnold bei CONR. Marrs Lageeinschätzung gibt Lynn Spencer in Touching History, S. 31, wieder:

Although Bob Marr took the initiative and ordered the Otis alert aircraft to battle stations within a minute of learning about the hijacking, he does not have the authority to scramble fighters to intercept a hijacked airliner. That approval must come frome the secretary of defense. He reports up the chain of command to his boss, Maj. Gen. Larry Arnold, at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida, who will then seek the higher authorization through the rest of the chain of command.

Marrs Interpretation der Richtlinien bestätigt der ebenfalls von Lynn Spencer interviewte Gen. Larry Arnold (Touching History, S. 38f.):

This is a lot less information [about AA 11] than Arnold would like, and a call from Boston Center hardly constitutes tha standard protocol to request military assistance. Such requests customarily come from FAA headquarters. But he knows that the protocol is based on assumptions […].
The bottom line is that one of his battle commanders has asked for assiatance in getting the authorizations he feels he needs. Arnold´s instincts tell him to act first and seek authorizations later. He´ll give Marr what he´s asking for.
“Go ahead and scramble and I´ll take care of the authorities,” Arnold assures Marr. Such a command should be coming from the secretary of defense, but Arnold isn´t going to wait on that.

In mehreren weiteren Befragungen und Interviews hat Arnold diese Lageeinschätzung wiederholt. Gen. Arnold im Interview im Code One Magazine, Januar 2002:

As I walked out of a video teleconference with NORAD, someone came up and told me that the Northeast Air Defense sector had a possible hijacking. My first thought was the hijacking was part of the exercise. But I knew otherwise by the time I talked with the commander of the Northeast Air Defense Sector. He had aircraft on battle stations. You might ask why the aircraft weren’t scrambled immediately. The procedure is that the FAA contacts the national military command center whenever there is a problem. They, in turn, go to NORAD to see if assets are available. Then the Secretary of Defense grants approval to intercept a hijacked airplane, which has heretofore been classified as a law enforcement issue.
I decided to give the go-ahead to scramble and work out the details later.

Gen. Arnold im Interview mit Leslie Filson, 11. September 2002:

By time I talked to bob marr, he said he had them on battle stations and he’d like to get them airborne, I said go ahead and scramble them and we’ll get authorities later

Gen. Arnold beim 2. Hearing der 9/11 Kommission, 23. Mai 2003:

As I picked up the phone, Bob told me that Boston Center had called possible hijacking within the system. He had put the aircraft at Otis on battle stations, wanted permission to scramble them. I told them to go ahead and scramble the airplanes and we’d get permission later. And the reason for that is that the procedure — hijacking is a law enforcement issue, as is everything that takes off from within the United States. And only law enforcement can request assistance from the military, which they did in this particular case. The route, if you follow the book, is they go to the duty officer of the national military center, who in turn makes an inquiry to NORAD for the availability of fighters, who then gets permission from someone representing the secretary of Defense. Once that is approved then we scramble aircraft. We didn’t wait for that. We scrambled the aircraft, told them get airborne, and we would seek clearances later. I picked up the phone, called NORAD, whose battle staff was in place because of the exercise, talked to the deputy commander for operations. He said, you know, “I understand, and we’ll call the Pentagon for those particular clearances.”

Gen. Arnold im Interview mit der 9/11 Kommission am 03. Februar 2004:

Arnold told Marr to scramble Otis ANGB air defense fighters. Arnold noted that he was aware of the formal process through the FAA and NMCC (National Military Command Center) for a scramble of fighters. […] Next he spoke with General Fedeling (a Canadian at NORAD) to facilitate receiving the appropriate clearances.

Marr bestätigt diese Rekapitulation in mehreren Interviews, bspw. mit Leslie Filson am 25. Juni 2002 und vor der 9/11 Kommission am 27. Oktober 2003 und am 23. Januar 2004.
Eine analoge Einschätzung der Rechtslage liefert außerdem Col. Randy Morris von CONR (CONR-Briefing, S. 3, meine Hervorh.):

Morris noted that Colonel Marr, Commander at Northeast Air Defense Sector (NEADS), called CONR to inform of a Potential hijack in the New York/Boston area. Morris responded to Marr that such an event falls under law enforcement jurisdiction. Marr replied that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had requested assistance and NEADS was “forward leaning” fighters from Otis AFB (Note: Morris is referring to Marr’s decision to place Otis ANGB NORAD air alert fighters at “Battle Stations”).

Die rechtliche Einschätzung bei der FAA

Daniel Bueno im ARTCC Boston (ZBW) war am 11.09.2001 für zwei zentrale Entscheidung zuständig:
1. Die Entscheidung, Controller der FAA im Cape TRACON (K90) anzurufen, die für die Otis ANGB zuständig sind, und um einen scramble zu bitten (eigenhändig).
2. Die Entscheidung, NEADS anzurufen und um einen scramble zu bitten (über Joseph Cooper und Colin Scoggins).
Die an den Anrufen Beteiligten, inkl. Bueno selbst, sind sich der Tatsache bewusst, dass insbesondere der este Anruf eine Protokollverletzung darstellt (vgl. Richtlinien Entführung, Teil 2).
Lynn Spencer interviewte auch Daniel Bueno für ihr Buch Touching History, das 2008 erschien. Spencers Narrativ zufolge glaubte Bueno zunächst, die FAA Order 7610.4J. Appendix 16, erlaube ihm diesen Anruf (Touching History, S. 22 (meine Hervorh.)):

Back at Boston Center, supervisor Dan Bueno has just hung up with the FAA Command Center in Herndon. His next move is to request military assistance from the 102nd Fighter Wing at Otis Air National Guard Base on Cape Cod. He knows it’s not standard operating procedure to call the military directly — that’s supposed to be done by FAA headquarters — but he’s checked the FAA regulation manual, and in the back under section FAAO 7610.4J. Appendix 16, it states that fighters can be launched directly at FAA request, so he is going to make that happen. He may not be FAA headquarters, but he is FAA!
When he reaches tower control at Otis, though, the controller tells him to contact NEADS, under Bob Marr’s command. That’s the protocol.
„You’ve got to go through the proper channels,” the controller says. „They’re the only ones with the authority to initiate a scramble order.” So much for the back page of the regulations manual.

Die zweite Protokollverletzung, der Anruf direkt bei NEADS, begründet Colin Scoggins, ein weiterer Beteiligter, ebenfalls in einem Interview mit “Nicht-Offiziellen” mit seiner Auslegung derselben Order (meine Hervorh.):

What I knew on 9-11 was that I could call NEADS and get them to launch fighters right away. The ADCF’s had authority to launch interceptors, with coordination to or from NORAD. They didn’t necessarily have to wait for a clearance from NORAD. They could launch on their own and then tell NORAD hey we are launching fighters for an escort mission of a hijacked aircraft. Why they waited for the okay from NORAD I don’t know it could have been a change on their end. But on 9-11 I believe they could have been launched without NORADS blessing.
Of course that’s my interpretation of FAAO 7610.4J. Appendix 16.

Appendix 16

Das Appendix 16 ist die FAA Authorization for Interceptor Operations (AFIO), wo es heißt:

Authority is granted for Commander in Chief NORAD (CINCNORAD), to operate interceptors subject to the conditions and in compliance with the responsibilities and standard operation procedures set forth therein.

Appendix 16 listet unter Abschnitt III (Procedures and Responsibilities) detailliert auf, welche Handlungsweisen eine Air Defense Control Facility (ADCF) im Falle eines Intercepts zu befolgen und wie die Kommunikation mit der Air Traffic Control (ATC) der FAA auszusehen hat. Als ADCF werden die folgenden Einrichtungen genannt:

Air Defense Control Facilities authorized to control interceptors in accordance with provisions of the FAA AFIO:
1. Southeast Sector Operations Control Center (SOCC), Tyndall AFB, FL.
2. Northeast Sector Operations Control Center (SOCC), Griffiss AFB, NY.
3. Northwest Sector Operations Control Center (SOCC), McChord AFB, WA.
4. Southwest Sector Operations Control Center (SOCC), March AFB, CA.
5. Alaskan Region Operations Control Center (SOCC), Elinendorf AFB, AK.

Die zweite der genannten Einrichtungen ist NEADS. Appendix 16, Abschnitt III. beschreibt also – auf 9/11 bezogen -, welche Handlungsweisen NEADS im Falle eines Intercepts zu befolgen und wie die Kommunikation mit dem ZBW auszusehen hat. Insbesondere mit Blick auf Abschnitt I., Authorization, kann man Appendix 16 als die Erlaubnis der FAA an das NEADS sehen, Intercept-Operationen im Luftraum des ZBW vorzunehmen.
Festgehalten werde sollte allerdings ebenfalls:
1. An keiner Stelle des Dokuments steht, dass der verantwortliche Leiter des betroffenen ARTCCs (d.h. des ZBW am 11.09.) befugt ist, bei einer ADCF (d.h. NEADS am 11.09.) eigenständig Abfangjäger anzufordern.
2. Die Erlaubnis der FAA an NEADS, Intercept-Operationen vorzunehmen, ist noch nicht die Erlaubnis von NORAD, NMCC, JCS oder SoD, Intercept-Operationen vorzunehmen. D.h., selbst wenn bspw. Col. Robert Marr durch des ARTCC Boston eine AFIO erhält, kann sie ihm ein Vorgesetzter bei NORAD oder ein Protokoll des DoD immer noch verbieten, respektive einen anderen Kommunikationsweg einfordern.
Diese Tatsache ist auch Colin Scoggins bewusst, der zugesteht, dass auch die spezifischen Richtlinien, die die Kommunikation zwischen ZBW und NEADS regeln, die Kommunikationsrichtung NEADS→ZBW, nicht ZBW→NEADS vorsehen (Scoggins MFR, S. 1):

Scoggins went to call NEADS to request a fighter scramble, but Joe Cooper was already doing that. The procedures for this are in a Letter of Agreement at Otis Air Force Base, noted Scoggins. According to the agreement between ZBW and NEADS, the military would call ZBW and inform them of the scramble, so the reverse order of the set procedure might have caused some confusion.

Es handelt sich hierbei nicht um nebensächliche Erbsenzählerei. Die Differenzen erklären, warum Col. Robert Marr 9/11 erst Rücksprache mit seinem Vorgesetzten Gen. Larry Arnold bei CONR hielt – die Autorisierung der FAA war ihm nicht genug, eben weil die Autorisierung im Entführungsfall dem Protokoll nach mindestens auch die Autorisierung durch CONR (bzw. jeweils eine Ebene höher durch NORAD, NMCC und den SoD) vorsah.

2. Paul Schreyer

Die komplexe Verstickung von Protokollen, parallelen Autorisierungsketten und Interpretationen bietet ausreichend Material für irreführende Darstellungen der Rechtslage durch Auslassung. Der Journalist Paul Schreyer ist hiefür ein Beispiel.
Schreyer wirft Col. Robert Marr in seinem Buch Inside 9/11 eine Reihe von Verzögerungen vor: „Fünf Verzögerungen – und ein Verantwortlicher“ (Inside 9/11, S. 74). Einer der Vorwürfe betrifft die 5-minütige Verzögerung zwischen 08:41 und 08:46 Uhr. Schreyer erklärt die “offizielle Version” zur Erklärung der Verzögerung zunächst korrekt (Inside 9/11, S. 39):

Die Verzögerung dieses Befehls wird offiziell damit erklärt, dass Colonel Marr, der Kommandant von NEADS, nicht die Befugnis gehabt habe, die Jäger aufsteigen zu lassen.

 

Filson und Marr

Schreyer zufolge gibt es jedoch gewichtige Gegenstimmen zur Behauptung, Marr hätte keine Befugnis gehabt, im Entführungsfall Abfangjäger aufsteigen zu lassen (ebd.):

Im Widerspruch dazu ist in einer offiziellen Chronik des Militärs zu lesen, dass Colonel Marr sehr wohl die Befugnis hatte, die Jäger aufsteigen zu lassen.

Die gemeinte „offizielle Chronik“ ist Leslie Filsons Air War Over America. Dort heißt es in der Tat auf S. 50 (meine Hervorh.):

Lt. Col. Jon Treacy, commander of the wing´s 101st Fighter Squadron, phoned NEADS – the Northeast Air Defense Sector – in Rome, N.Y., to report the FAA`s request. The sector commander would have authority to scramble the airplanes.

Es handelt sich um die Lagebeschreibung aus Sicht von Lt. Col. Jon Treacy, kein absolutes Urteil von Filson oder gar der USAF – aus Sicht der USAF bzw. Treacy wäre Marr der nächsthöhere Ansprechpartner für einen scramble.
Diese vorsichtige Interpretation bestätigt sich im weiteren Textverlauf, in dem Filson die Rechtslage referiert (Air War Over America, S. 51 (meine Hervorh.)):

If normal procedures had taken place that morning, [Jeremy] Powell [at NEADS] wouldn´t have taken that phone call. Normally, the FAA would have contacted officials at the Pentagon´s National Military Command Center who would have contacted the North American Aerospace Defense Command. The secretary of defense would have had to approve the use of military assets to assist in a hijacking, always considered a law enforcement issue. But nothing was normal on Sept. 11, 2001, and many say the traditional chain of command went by the wayside to get the job done.

Im Folgenden rekapituliert Filson das Marr-Arnold-Gespräch. Die finale Einschätzung zeigt einmal mehr, dass Filson die Protokollverletzung der Situation anerkennt (Air War Over America, S. 56, meine Hervorh.):

It was unfamiliar territory, but Marr knew what he had to do.

Warum Schreyer ausgerechnet Filsons Buch als Berufungsinstanz für seine Marr-Kritik heranzieht, ist unklar.

 

Scoggins und Marr

Schreyers zweite Berufungsinstanz ist der unter 1. zitierte FAA-Controller Colin Scoggins (Inside 9/11, S. 39):

Colin Scoggins, der militärische Verbindungsbeamte des Boston Centers, betonte 2007 in einem Interview, dass die Rückfrage bei General Arnold „nicht notwendig“ war, um Jäger aufsteigen zu lassen.

Hierzu sei dreierlei angemerkt.
Erstens, auch Scoggins ist sich des eigentlichen Protokolls bewusst:

The protocol was that the controller would tell his supervisor; his supervisor would call the Operational manager in Charge (OMIC).  The OMIC would call the Regional Operational Center (ROC), the ROC would call the Hijack Coordinator in Washington, the Hijack Coordinator would call the military.  As far as controllers are concerned they probably only knew the first two or three steps, they didn’t need to know any further.
In June 2001 a new order or instruction had come out from the Joint Chiefs, the CJCSI 3610.01A. Some skeptics think that controllers or lower level management people should have been aware of this instruction. The FAA will take an instruction like this and eventually incorporate this into the document. I didn’t know about this instruction until I was actually interviewed by the Justice Department.
The Hijack coordinator was supposed to notify the National Military Command Center (NMCC), I believe they are located at the Pentagon.  The NMCC would notify NORAD, NORAD would notify one of three Air Defense Control Facilities (ADCF’s), in our case Northeast Air Defense Sector (NEADS). The ADCF would call the alert site, in our case Otis ANGB (FMH).

Zweitens, Scoggins relativisert seine Einschätzung explizit mit Blick darauf, dass er die parallelen NORAD-Protokolle nicht kenne und es sich bei seinen Ausführungen um seine eigene Auslegung des Appendix 16 handle (meine Hervorh.):

What I knew on 9-11 was that I could call NEADS and get them to launch fighters right away. The ADCF’s had authority to launch interceptors, with coordination to or from NORAD. They didn’t necessarily have to wait for a clearance from NORAD. They could launch on their own and then tell NORAD hey we are launching fighters for an escort mission of a hijacked aircraft. Why they waited for the okay from NORAD I don’t know it could have been a change on their end. But on 9-11 I believe they could have been launched without NORADS blessing.
Of course that’s my interpretation of FAAO 7610.4J. Appendix 16.

In mehreren weiteren Online-Beiträgen führt Scoggins diese Einschätzung weiter aus – mit gelegentlichen Schwankungen. Bsp. 1 (meine Hervorh.):

Look at a copy of Appendix 16 in the 7610.4H I may be pushing the authority issue here, but my interpretation was that the SOCC could launch without a direct call from NORAD, that NORAD had issued them that authority under Appendix 16.

Bsp. 2 (meine Hervorh.):

As far as the law, I’m no lawyer but allot of people have looked at Chapter 4 intercept procedures, and a llot of people have looked at chapter 7 Escort procedures. Not to many people look at Appendix 16 which covers some of the guts about how, when and who does all of the Intercept stuff. If you turn the words around and I can’ be specific since I don’t have my copy, but you can interpret that with NORADS authority the ADCF (NEADS) in this case may actually be able to launch fighters for intercepts. I don’t beleive it mentions the NMCC becasue we are talking about Active Scrambles not Escort.
The proper protocol is to go through the chain of command in the 7610.4, and a request to the NMCC for Escort Services, and I assume the Secretary of Defense will approve.
But from the controllers prosective is I have a Hijack, I am required to escort the aircraft under Chapter 7. I have aircraft on the ground on alert at Otis ANGB, the only way to get them off is by Scrambling them, the only way to scramble them is to call NEADS. They have the scramble circuit. We call NEADS they scramble the aircraft we intercept or we will use the politically correct name and we will escort the aircraft. It would be interesting to know how we scrambled or escorted the Lufthansa 592 aircraft to JFK in 1993, I was involved in this one a little, but I think we pretty much went through the same process above, we had more time becasue we already knew the aircraft was hijacked, but I don’t think we aited for the NMCC and the Secretary of Defense it was done pretty much the same way.

Drittens, selbst wenn Appendix 1 an Marr eine AFIO der FAA darstellt, muss dies Marr nicht reichen, da die Erlaubnis von CONR (NORAD/NMCC/SoD) damit noch immer nicht vorliegt.
In diesem Kontext sollte auch beachtet werden, mit welchen Hintergrund Scoggins spricht. Scoggins geht es darum, das Handeln des ZBW zu begründen und die Protokollverletzung des ZBW zu legitimieren (meine Hervorh.).

What I knew on 9-11 was that I could call NEADS and get them to launch fighters right away.

The proper protocol is to go through the chain of command in the 7610.4, and a request to the NMCC for Escort Services, and I assume the Secretary of Defense will approve.
But from the controllers prosective is I have a Hijack, I am required to escort the aircraft under Chapter 7. I have aircraft on the ground on alert at Otis ANGB, the only way to get them off is by Scrambling them, the only way to scramble them is to call NEADS.

Dies erklärt auch eine zentrale Unklarheit in den Ausführungen von Scoggins, die sich an der folgenden Formulierung extrapolieren lässt (Quelle, meine Hervorh.):

If you turn the words around and I can’ be specific since I don’t have my copy, but you can interpret that with NORADS authority the ADCF (NEADS) in this case may actually be able to launch fighters for intercepts.

Was bedeutet der Einschub “with NORADS authority”? Appendix 16 stellt bereits die Autorisierung an Marr durch NORAD dar? Dies ist nicht der Fall, denn es handelt sich um eine Richtlinie der FAA. Col. Marr braucht neben der Autorisierung durch die FAA noch die Autorisierung durch das NORAD? Eben das glaubte Marr auch und ist die Erklärung seiner Verzögerung.
Scoggins selbst
erkennt dies übrigens an (meine Hervorh.):

Priot to 9/11 if fighters were only used as escorts in a hijack situation. Even though we call them interceptors, there only tasking was was to escort. As the day of events of 9/11 occurred things changed.
Three months after 9/11 we had a lessons learned meeting at Boston Center we had a captian from NORAD, who was a pilot, said that if he was in a fighter on an escort of a hijack and thought the plane was going to crash into a building and thought that he could put the aircraft down in a safe place that he would without any order.
Well that sounds like just talk, and my assumption is on that day that there was a lot of talk, about what and who could shoot down aircraft and with what authority. However there are certain people in charge and for a reason. Col. Marr at NEADS wasn’t going to issue any order that he wasn’t comfortable with as far as its clarity and without what he beleived had the proper authority. The Secretary of Defense, NORAD, the President or the Vice President didn’t have the fighters on frequency but Col. Marr did, the final order would have been issued by him.

 

Schreyer und Scoggins

Der Komplex der Direktiven und ihrer Auslegung ist voller Fallstricke und Interpretationsfragen. In einem Fall werden die Direktiven gar nicht erst gelesen, in einem zweiten Fall – dem vorliegenden – wird ihre Auslegung extrem verkürzt und einseitig dargestellt. Paul Schreyer folgert allein aus der Einschätzung von Scoggins (Inside 9/11, S. 39):

Die Verzögerung des „Scramble“-Befehls ist damit weiterhin ungeklärt.

Schreyer hat damit nicht einmal eine Interpretationsdifferenz anerkannt – Appendix 16 taucht in seinem Text ebensowenig auf wie das JCS-Protokoll CJCSI 3610.01a und die FAA Order 7610.4 -, er hat lediglich 1. die Interpretation von Scoggins als korrekt vorausgesetzt, 2. die relativierenden Einlassungen von Scoggins selbst ignoriert.
Die Verzögerung erklärt sich aus den parallelen Protokollen, unabhängig davon, ob die Interpretation von Scoggins korrekt oder für die Frage nach Marrs Befehlsgewalt überhaupt relevant ist.

 

Literatur

Filson, Leslie: Air War over America. Sept. 11 alters Face of Air Defense Mission. Tyndall AFB 2003

Schreyer, Paul: Inside 9/11. Neue Fakten und Hintergründe zehn Jahre danach. Berlin: Kai Homilius Verlag 2011

Spencer, Lynn: Touching History. The Untold Drama that Unfolded in the Skies over America on 9/11. New York u.a.: Free Press 2008

Hinterlasse eine Antwort

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *

*

Du kannst folgende HTML-Tags benutzen: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>